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DIY Uncategorized

How To Build a Spinning Wheel

Why Build a Spinning Wheel?

For our recent reboot of the Elevate series, Berry Blast Theme Park, our staff and volunteers took time and effort to make a “point system” that would energize the kids and match the theme of our environment in FC Kids. The result: The Berry Blast Spinning Wheel! Our kids loved getting to come up and spin the wheel when their team won. It also gave them motivation to participate. Below are the instructions to make one for your environment, though you can adapt it for your own purposes.

BBTP Spinning WheelMaterials Needed (and found at your local hardware store):
1/2” Sheet of Plywood or MDF
4×4’ Post
2 2’x4’s
BBTP Spinner Art (optional)
8 1/4” dowels
A Lazy Susan with the top removed
3/8” x 5” Bolt with a lock nut
3/8” Washers
Wood Trim
Thin Piece of Stiff Leather or Plastic
Box of 3” Philips Wood Screws
Plastic Screw Head Covers
Nail Gun and Nails for Nail Gun (optional)
Wood Glue
Wood Puddy
Drill
Paint and/or Print Pieces for the wheel
Paint for the base and trim
Pencil

How To:

1. Use a 1/2” sheet of plywood or MDF to create a 30” circle, with a hole in the center of the circle for a 3/8” bolt.

2. Divide the circle into 20 ‘pie’ wedges, more or less, for the points. (Note: There are twenty wedges exactly on the BBTP Spinner Art). Mark with a regular pencil.

3. Drill twenty holes for the 1/4” dowels about an inch inside all around the edge of the circle and evenly spaced apart. They need to be aligned with the edge of each ‘pie wedge’.

4. Cut the 1/4” dowels to about 4” long and glue them in the holes you just drilled. We used wood glue. These dowel rods will be used as handles to spin the wheel, as well as the stoppers for the flapper.

5. Paint the circle and the stoppers the same color. We used Behr® Ultra, Satin Finish “Glidden Fresh Tangerine”.

6. Print the “BBTP_Spinner_Art.jpg” from the Environmental Graphics folder (available when you purchase the series) and adhere to the inside of the circle with screws. We used plastic screw head covers to disguise them. You can also create your own art. You can decorate your ‘pie wedges’ with different colors, different point amounts or whatever you are having the kids try to win. You can do this by painting, or by printing pieces, to adhere to the ‘pie wedges’.

7. To mount the circle to it’s stand, use a 4’x4’ post that’s at least 4’ tall. Mark a hole centered 20” down from the top the post, and drill a 3/8” hole all the way through the post. This is for the bolt that goes through the post and the center of the circle. We used washers to create space between the post and the circle so that the wheel can spin freely. We also used the base and ring with ball bearings from a lazy susan to help the circle spin. So the end result on the bolt went in this order (from back to front):

Bolt -> Washer -> Post -> Washer -> Lazy Susan base (with ball bearings facing the circle) -> Circle (with Art Attached) -> Washer -> Lock Nut

Note: Do NOT screw the Lazy Susan Base to the circle, instead, tighten the Bolt and Lock Nut just enough so the wheel spins freely and the ball bearings stay inside the Lazy Susan Base.

8. Use 2×4’s to create a base for the post and spinner. Screw the 2’x4’s to the bottom of the post first, in a radiating pattern. Then attach MDF around the edge in the form of a box. Then use the remaining MDF to form the top of the base. Finally, attach the trim with a nail gun, or other method, around the sides and edges of the base.

9. Use wood putty to fill the nail holes. When dry, paint the base and trim.

10. About an inch above the top edge of the spinner, drill a hole in the post for a 1/4” dowel that is at least 3 inches long. Using a jig saw, cut a narrow channel through that dowel and attach a thin piece of leather or plastic that hangs down. This creates the flapper that needs to be long enough to hit each of the dowels on the spinner.

11. Now you are done! Place your Berry Blast Wheel on your stage for the lessons and let the fun begin!

DIY Uncategorized Volunteers

Making a Creative Volunteer Team (Preschool Renovation part 2)

Here’s a shout out to a great group of creative volunteers who make Fellowship Church an awesome place for FCKids. Every couple of years we remodel our Preschool Building to update and re-innovate all of the spaces. Our latest job was to tackle our Preschool Rooms and the North lobby check-in area. As always it was a joy to see volunteers stream in and offer their talents. I am always amazed at the skills people have and are willing to share with the church. Take a look at some pictures I took of the creative volunteer team in action.

Here’s advice I give to people who ask how we get so many volunteers out to do creative projects like this.

First: Start Small but be Visible
1- Find a creative person, or two, who can work on a small project for you, something that will catch some attention.
2- Put on the finished project a sign that says “Done by Volunteers of “Fellowship Church” (your church name).
3- Put the project out where it can be seen by as many people as possible.
4- Have a sign up sheet beside the project that says something like: “Interested in being involved in a creative project like this? Sign up here and we’ll get you started”
5- Contact the 1 or 2 (or more) that sign up and you’ve suddenly got the workings of a team.

Second: Be Bolder and Bigger
Follow the same steps as above but use your newfound people to make an even bigger scaled project. Use it to attract even more people.

Third: Be Patient
Keep this process up and slowly, but surely, you will find a group of people that you can use to do just about anything. Just don’t expect it all to happen overnight. The team for FCKids took several years to develop and we are continuing to grow.

DIY FC Kids Uncategorized

Wonder and Palette's playroom now open!

Wonder & Palette's Playroom

Preschool Renovation: Part 1
What once was a seldom used area near one of our Preschool lobbies at Fellowship Church, is a space that has now become an interactive playroom for kids to hang out while mom and dad chat and check in before services! All themed by Wonder and Palette!

With a week of work and a lot of volunteers, our team transformed the lobby in time for Easter services. First we removed the old walls, created cubby spaces for the window TV’s, reframed and drywalled the area, cut out the foam core graphics, painted the edges, and placed the final touches from our favorite store…IKEA!

These updates changed the entire atmosphere in our Preschool lobby. Now, the 2-3 year olds sit down to color while moms and dads meet other moms and dads, and new families immediately see how important their children are to us in FCKids.

Taking on a build project to change the environment of your church may seem like a daunting task, but it makes a big difference in the atmosphere of your church. Think of it like this: you remodel your home to make it comfortable and inviting for yourself and for your guests. In the same way, we remodel the areas of our church to make them more comfortable and inviting for our attendees and visitors.

Over the next few weeks I will share the details of how we made this project come together successfully.

You can use the same graphics we did to decorate your preschool area too! Visit ElevateAtChurch.com to download the full sized Preschool Wall Art and Graphics.

Behind the Scenes DIY Uncategorized

Building Dinosaurs

One of my hobbies is to dabble in sculpting. I find my creative thoughts come easier when I am using my hands to make something. Some things are small (Winnie the Pooh, Lumiere and Cogsworth) and some are large (the mountain in our CCC building)…

But I’ve never tackled a Dinosaur!

DIY Elevate Production Uncategorized

Elevate: Roanoke Jones Logo Development Process

I thought you might like to see how we create the logos you see for each Elevate series. This is the development process we went through to get the Roanoke Jones logo.

Step 1 – Different logo concepts were sketched out and we chose the one that fit best.

Step 2 – The sketch was recreated digitally.

Step 3 – More detail was added to the logo and different variations were created.

Step 4 – The best attributes of each variation were merged into the final design.

Step 5 – Texture and shading were added to the design to arrive at the final logo.

I hope you enjoyed this look at our development process. I am very excited about the Roanoke Jones Series and can’t wait for you to see the rest of it!